On speed and fluency

I really enjoyed this article by former NCTM president Cathy Seeley, “Faster Isn’t Smarter”. It’s been interesting over the years to get to talk to many mathematicians that did not feel like they were good at math as children, because of their relatively slow speed.

Fluency matters, but it’s not real surprising that students expect all math problems to be solvable within seconds if they are given thousands of problems that are solved within seconds, and rewarded for how quickly or how many they can do within a time limit. Seeley also discusses issues that emerge in a timed, high-stress environment:

“Some students respond well to competitive and timed situations, thriving on the pressure to bring out their best; others have quite a different reaction. This particular boy received a clear message that some students are good at math and some are not—and he knew which group he was in. He also was prevented from finishing the test, something that causes some students tremendous frustration.”

The article offers some simple suggestions for changing this dynamic in favor of fluency without focusing on speed. Thanks!

Advertisements

About Bowen Kerins
Bowen is a mathematics curriculum writer. He is a lead author of CME Project, a high school curriculum focused on mathematical habits of mind, and part of the author team of the Illustrative Mathematics curriculum series. Bowen leads professional development nationally, primarily on how math content can be taught with a focus on higher-level goals. Bowen is also a champion pinball player and once won $1,000 for knowing the number of degrees in a right angle.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: